Managing Colleges and Universities: Issues for Leadership

By Allan M. Hoffman; Randal W. Summers | Go to book overview
Step 1: At the designated time, both the evaluator and evaluated fill out the appropriate rating scales and/or other forms.Step 2: The evaluatee submits a self-rating scale along with another form that includes narrative descriptions that includes these categories:
A. Position description
B. Unusual aspects of work-related activities since the previous evaluation
1. Unexpected developments/happenings
2. Most positive work-related happenings
3. Most negative work-related happenings
4. Problems to be solved, with possible solutions/ameloriations
5. Possible changes in position description
C. Professional development needs/aspirations for the future.

This report is submitted to the evaluator one week in advance.

Step 3: A one-hour conference is scheduled between the employee and the employer. No particular structure for the conference is recommended. The conference discusses employee and employer responses on the rating scales in addition to the employee's narrative responses, as well as any narrative reports by the supervisor. The conference should conclude with some developmental, next steps, even for the superior-rated employee, under the assumption that when "you're through learning, you're through!"

Step 4: The evaluator submits to the employee, within one week, a summary statement of the conference, concluding with a developmental section.

Step 5: The employee signs the employer's report to the effect that he or she has read the report. The employee can attach a rebuttal and/or comments on an addendum to the report if the employee so wishes.

Step 6: If differences about aspects of the report exist, a follow-up conference may be desirable, or a prior meeting between the academic dean and the supervisor may be desirable before a follow-up employer-employee meeting.

An administrative evaluation system should be simple in form and structure, consistent in use, open in intent and operation, and both formative and summative in function.


REFERENCE

Salamone Ronald E. and Vorhies Arthur. 1985. Just rewards: Ensuring equitable salary reviews. Education Record 66(3), 44-47.

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