10
The Revolution Moves to the Right, 1940-1970

The year 1940 marked more than another election and the end of the Cárdenas era. Some have argued that 1940 saw the end of the revolutionary struggle, more specifically, that the liberal experimentation culminating with Cárdenas came to a close. The reforms he had directed were replaced, many before they could be implemented. In this new atmosphere politics had a more conservative outlook. In part, more people wanted to preserve what they had. Increasing numbers of Mexicans acquired symbols of the nation's new wealth by purchasing homes and cars, taking vacations, and enrolling their children in schools in the United States and Europe. The section of Mexican society that benefited the most from the policies that followed the Cárdenas era was the growing middle class.

From 1940 to 1970 Mexico experienced what has been called an economic miracle -- a 120 percent growth in the industrial sector and a 100 percent increase in agricultural production. 1 Exactly what drove this growth remains part of a complex equation, although certainly the outbreak of World War II contributed significantly. As international trade became difficult as a result of the war-time emergency, Mexico was unable to import consumer goods that the growing middle class wanted and could purchase. Consequently the nation began to produce these

-175-

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The History of Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Advisory Board ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Timeline of Historical Events xiii
  • 1 - Mexico Today 1
  • 2 - Mexico's Early Inhabitants 13
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - The Conquest 31
  • Notes 46
  • 4 - The Colonial Era, 1521-1821 47
  • Notes 72
  • 5 - The Wars of Mexican Independence, 1808-1821 75
  • Notes 88
  • 6 - The Aftermath of Independence, 1821-1876 89
  • Notes 110
  • 7 - The Porfiriato, 1876-1911 113
  • Notes 128
  • 8 - The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1920 131
  • Notes 153
  • 9 - Consolidation of the Revolution 155
  • Notes 172
  • 10 - The Revolution Moves to the Right, 1940-1970 175
  • Notes 191
  • 11 - The Search for Stability, 1970-1999 193
  • Notes 213
  • Notable People in the History of Mexico 215
  • Bibliographic Essay 227
  • Index 235
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