Captivity, Flight, and Survival in World War II

By Alan J. Levine | Go to book overview

5
` Escape from the Kingdom of Death: Jewish Escapes in Occupied Europe

For Jews who fell under Nazi control, survival and escape, of one sort or another, were intertwined in a way that was not true for almost any other group caught up in World War II. Escapes were all too rare, yet some took place, even under the most horrible conditions. Jews fled ghettos, trains carrying them to the extermination camps, and hardest of all, the camps themselves, often making journeys of hundreds of miles to reach safety (often only relative safety); they hid among Christians or took refuge in forests, to eke out a precarious existence for months, even years.

In most places, from 1939 to 1941, Nazi conquest was so quick that few Jews could get out ahead of it. Indeed, surprisingly few tried, for while no Jews (at least outside the USSR) doubted that the Nazis were hostile, few understood the enemy's intentions. Contrary to a now widespread belief, only a minority of European Jews, outside Germany and Austria, had wanted to leave their homes before the outbreak of war, and now it was too late. That the rulers of one of the world's most advanced countries were not just tyrants and oppressors, but were bent on their complete destruction seemed unbelievable to both Jews and others. The Nazis carefully concealed what they were doing and cultivated the Jews' illusions until the last minute. Many never realized what was happening until they were inside the extermination camps. Some Soviet Jews, like many of Stalin's subjects, even welcomed Hitler's troops as liberators, only to discover their error when they were mowed down by SS machine guns.

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Captivity, Flight, and Survival in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.