The Information Society: Economic, Social, and Structural Issues

By Jerry L. Salvaggio | Go to book overview

of nations as labels for complex patterns of variation for which variable names cannot be easily substituted. The present discussion only makes a few preliminary moves in the direction of specifying categories and dimensions of variation. Much conceptual work remains to be done.

Another problem is a more empirical one of adequately measuring national variations. There are a number of more or less reliable indicators of the development and use of communications (e.g., the number of households subscribing to cable). But many aspects of communications policy and the national setting are not readily measured and must be studied from a more qualitative/historical perspective.

In summary, a comparative framework should guide more discussions of the information society because it focuses attention on how and why nations respond differently to the problems and opportunities posed by new technology. What factors mediate and differentiate responses to these rather universal technological developments? What consequences will these national contexts have on the way in which communications infrastructures and services are provided? And what consequences for society result from national responses to technological change? Although there are practical, conceptual, and methodological difficulties in pursuing comparative research, this perspective provokes a set of questions that should be addressed in discussions of the information society.


REFERENCES

Blumler J. G. ( 1987). "Live and let live: The politics of cable". In W. H. Dutton, J. G. Blumler, & K. L. Kraemer (Eds.), Wired cities: Shaping the future of communications. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall.

Cayrol R. ( 1987). "The post-1981 national policy context for new communication technologies". In W. H. Dutton, J. G. Blumler, & K. L. Kraemer (Eds.), Wired cities: Shaping the future of communications. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall.

Danziger J. N., Dutton W. H., Kling R., & Kraemer K. L. ( 1982). Computers and politics: High technology in American local governments. New York: Columbia University Press.

Dordick H. S., Bradley H. G., & Nanus B. ( 1980). The emerging network marketplace. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

Dutton W. H. ( 1987). "The politics of cable policy in Britain". Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, Illinois, September 3-6, 1987.

Dutton W. H., & Blumler J. G. ( 1988). "The faltering development of cable television in Britain", International Political Science Review, 9, 4, 279-303.

Dutton W. H., Blumler J. G., & Kraemer K. L. (Eds.). ( 1987). Wired cities: Shaping the future of communications. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall.

Dutton W. H., Dordick H., & Phillips A. ( 1984). "Perspectives on national cable policy: Focusing the issues". Telematics and Informatics, 1(2) (March-April), 153-170.

Dutton W. H., & Kraemer K. L. ( 1985). Modeling as negotiating. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

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The Information Society: Economic, Social, and Structural Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Toward a Definition of the Information Society 1
  • References 13
  • 2 - Evolving to an Information Society: Issues and Problems 15
  • References 25
  • 3 - The Origins of the Information Society in the United States: Competing Visions 29
  • References 48
  • 4 - Silicon Valley: A Scenario for the Information Society of Tomorrow 51
  • References 62
  • 5 - A Comparative Perspective on Information Societies 63
  • References 86
  • 6 - Communication Technology: For Better or for Worse? 89
  • References 103
  • 7 - Information for What Kind of Society? 105
  • References 113
  • 8 - Is Privacy Possible in an Information Society? 115
  • References 129
  • Selected Reading 131
  • Author Index 135
  • Subject Index 139
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