The Civil Service in Britain and France

By William A. Robson | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

NINE of the essays in this book originally appeared in a special number of The Political Quarterly for October- December 1954. The special number was devoted to the Civil Service to mark the centenary of the Trevelyan-Northcote reforms of 1854. But its purpose was not only to look backwards along the path we have travelled during the past century but to consider the Civil Service in relation to its present tasks and the emerging needs of the British people.

The special number of the review was quickly sold out, and the demand from home and overseas readers was so great that a second printing was required.

In view of the continuing interest of students, officials, political scientists, sociologists, politicians, journalists and citizens in the Civil Service and its problems, it was decided to publish the essays in a more permanent form. They embody an exceptional range of knowledge and experience of Ministerial office, the highest positions in the Civil Service, and University teaching and research.

The authors have in most instances revised or expanded their original essays. This applies to chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 12. In addition, five entirely new essays have been specially written for the book and are now published for the first time. These are: Bureaucracy and Democracy by William A. Robson; The Colonial Service by The Right Hon. A. Creech Jones, M.P.; Civil Service Establishments and the Treasury by Sir Thomas Padmore; Whitley Councils in the Civil Service by Douglas Houghton, M.P.; and the Recruitment and Training of Higher Civil Servants in the United Kingdom and in France by André Bertrand.

I should like to express my gratitude to those who have cooperated so generously in this literary enterprise, sometimes in ways which are not visible. My thanks are also due to Miss Jennifer Hines, who compiled the index, read the final proofs, and assisted me in other ways.

W. A. R.

-vii-

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