The Civil Service in Britain and France

By William A. Robson | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
THE FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH SERVICES

By ERNEST DAVIES, M.P.

( Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs , 1950-1951)

THE Foreign Office and Diplomatic Service has long been regarded with prejudice. Its necessary adherence to convention and tradition, its strict observance of protocol, the narrow social circle from which it was drawn and the maintenance in embassies abroad of standards of diplomatic life quite out of keeping with modern ideas are among the reasons. Belief that it is the Foreign Office rather than cabinets and Ministers that make foreign policy is another reason why it is looked at askance. This is mistaken prejudice. The Foreign Office does not comprise only gentlemen of means, drawn from Eton and Harrow and Oxford and Cambridge, well versed in culture and social etiquette, but less so in commerce and economics. Nor does the Foreign Office determine policy; for that the Prime Minister and Secretary of State are responsible, and the Cabinet and Parliament have the last word.

In all these regards there have been great changes during the last century. Transformation began with the merging of the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Service after the first world war and was completed with the 1943 reforms which added the Consular and the Commercial Diplomatic Services and brought them together into a unified Foreign Service distinct from the Home Civil Service. 1 Partly because of this and partly because the work of the Foreign Office has greatly increased, the total staff has trebled since 1939, and now exceeds 8,000 including the locally recruited staff but excluding the German section of about 1,000. The Foreign Office personnel in branch A (which is referred to later) is approximately only 700.

When the Foreign Office first became a separate department

____________________
1
Proposals for the reform of the Foreign Service 1943 Cmd. 6420.

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Civil Service in Britain and France
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.