The Civil Service in Britain and France

By William A. Robson | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
THE STRUCTURE OF THE CIVIL SERVICE

By H. R. G. GREAVES (Reader in Public Administration in the University of London)


I

EXTENSION of state activity in the twentieth century has wrought big changes in the general picture of the Civil Ser- vice. The more obvious of these are three: an immense increase in size; the inclusion within it of a large body of professional, scientific and technical staff, now actually outnumbering the ad- ministrative and executive officials, yet fitting uneasily into its hierarchical structure; and the spreading outwards from White- hall of important fields of its work with a consequent geographi- cal dispersal of its emplacement.

In the middle of 1955--and speaking in thousands--there were 248 civil servants in the Post Office and 388 in all other departments. Analysis of the latter according to the functions of their offices is highly instructive, for it reveals how small a part of the whole is now taken up by what may be regarded as the older functions of government, those classified as 'central govern- ment, home and legal departments' and 'foreign and imperial services'; these together amount to 32, or less than the staff of a single social service department, the Ministry of Pen- sions and National Insurance. The revenue departments have another 67. Those classified as dealing with 'trade, industry and transport' have 69, while offices concerned with the social ser- vices have 65. And the remainder of the staff in civil estab- lishments are the 21 who are mainly in the Ministry of Works, the Ordnance Survey and the Stationery Office, denominated 'agency services'. This makes a total of 254, which compares with 134 in the defence departments--Admiralty, War, Air, and Supply--ranging from 27 to 39 each.

It is significant too that by far the largest of the civil depart- ments are those in which there is the maximum dispersal. Again

-98-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Civil Service in Britain and France
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.