Government Regulation of Railway Rates: A Study of the Experience of the United States, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Australia

By Hugo Richard Meyer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
PAGE
THE DECISIONS OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMIS- SION (CONCLUDED)--PANDORA'S BOX397

Relative prosperity regulated by a distance tariff. The bitterness of local jealousies. Opposition to the westward trend of industry. "Reasons" for discrimination by the Commission against Michigan salt. The menace to trade implied in regulation of competition. The distance tariff versus the basing-point system in transcontinental traffic. The central West demands distance tariff for southern trade. Assumption of dispensing power by the Commission. Regulation by men, not by law.


CHAPTER IX
THE PORT DIFFERENTIALS440

The Commissions's cost of service theory breaks down.


CHAPTER X
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION449

The problem. Prussia paralyzes the railways. The governments of Europe refuse to promote interstate commerce. Russia paralyzes the Siberian Railway. Australia's lesson. Government-made rates concentrate trade and promote discrimination. Government-made rates must be machine-made. Discrimination the secret of efficiency of American railways. The Supreme Courts doctrine of railway rates. The carriers best qualified to adjust railway rates. Unjust rates not numerous. Existing unjust rates not made in bad faith. Power to condemn a rate is sufficient. Prompt relief attainable under present law. Real nature of the demand for power. The demand for amendment of long-and-short-haul clause. The power to fix a minimum rate. Government-made rates would restrict competition and trade. The significance of Boron and Albany versus Boston and Lowell.

INDEX473

-xvi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Government Regulation of Railway Rates: A Study of the Experience of the United States, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.