Government Regulation of Railway Rates: A Study of the Experience of the United States, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Australia

By Hugo Richard Meyer | Go to book overview

of the traffic. Were they allowed to drive out of the field the 300-ton canal boats, they could much more than double their present traffic, for new facilities create new business. With such an increase in the volume of traffic, it would be possible for them, without further economies, to lower enormously their average receipts, which are, respectively, 1.2 cents and 1.28 cents per ton-mile of freight carried. Any such increase in the volume of traffic would, moreover, justify these roads in bringing their property up to something like American standards of technical efficiency; and that increased efficiency, in turn, would ultimately lower the general level of charges to a point such as has never been, and never can be, enjoyed by French industry on a 300-ton canalboat basis. Finally, freedom for these roads to make rates in competition with the waterways would cause a general level of low railway rates to be diffused over the whole country, and would do away with the extraordinary discrimination which now exists in France in favor of districts supplied with waterways and against those supplied with railways alone.*

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*
C Colson: Transports et Tariff.

-132-

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