The Abortion Controversy: A Documentary History

By Eva R. Rubin | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Major Supreme Court Decisions Related to Abortion, 1973-1993

MAJOR CASES DECIDED IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, 1973-1993, ON STATE AND FEDERAL LAWS REGULATING ABORTION
This list gives the date the case was decided, name of case, citation to the case in U.S. Supreme Court Reports, the vote of the justices, a note indicating whether the decision was pro-abortion (PA) or anti-abortion (AA), and a generalization about the holding. A glossary of terms used in state and federal legislation follows the list.
1973. Roe v. Wade ( 410 U.S. 113). Vote 7-2. PA

A Texas law making abortion a crime was found to be unconstitutional. The Constitution was interpreted to protect a woman's right to choose to have an abortion during the first three months of pregnancy. State regulation of abortion was acceptable, in some circumstances, in the last six months of pregnancy.

1973. Doe v. Bolton ( 410 U.S. 179). Vote 7-2. PA

This was a companion case to Roe v. Wade. A Georgia law requiring that abortions be performed in hospitals, with two doctors present, and be approved by a hospital committee was found to limit the constitutional right too strictly and was held unconstitutional.

1976. Planned Parenthood of Central Missouri v. Danforth ( 428 U.S. 552). Vote 5-4. PA

The first major case decided since Roe. The Court overturned a Missouri law that required a woman to obtain the consent of her parents or husband before an abortion, required a lecture on fetal development, and required record keeping and reporting of all abortions by physicians.

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The Abortion Controversy: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • Part I - Before 1960 1
  • Abortion in Historical Context 3
  • Contraception and Abortion in America Before 1960 10
  • Bibliography 43
  • Part II - The Abortion Reform Movement (1960-1972) 45
  • The Reformers 47
  • Catalysts 68
  • Reform Activity in State Legislatures (1967-1972) 79
  • The Politics of State Legislative Reform (1967-1973) 82
  • Breakthrough in the Courts 89
  • The Abortion Situation Worldwide 100
  • Public Opinion 103
  • Conclusion 107
  • Philosophical Arguments for and Against the Liberalization of Abortion Laws 109
  • Bibliography 116
  • Part III - The 1973 Abortion Cases 117
  • The Law and the Cases 119
  • The Immediate Reaction to the Abortion Decisions 140
  • Bibliography 169
  • Part IV - The Battle Lines Are Drawn (1974-1980) 171
  • State Legislative Action and Judicial Response (1974-1980) 173
  • Amending the Constitution 189
  • Politics and Elections 219
  • Conclusion 223
  • Bibliography 231
  • Part V - The Reagan and Bush Administrations and Beyond (1980- ) 233
  • National Politics 237
  • State Legislation During the 1980s 267
  • New Issues and Problems 273
  • Bibliography 283
  • Epilogue - 1993 and After 285
  • Appendix A - Major Supreme Court Decisions Related to Abortion, 1973-1993 291
  • Appendix B - Chronology of Events in the Abortion Controversy 295
  • Index 303
  • About the Editor 312
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