Film Directors on Directing

By John Andrew Gallagher | Go to book overview

James Glickenhaus

In The Soldier ( 1982), The Protector ( 1985), and Shakedown ( 1988), James Glickenhaus has perfected the time-honored movie tradition of the chase, with logistically complex, stunt-laden sequences that have earned him a place as one of the world's premier action directors. The ski pursuit over the Alps in The Soldier; the New York harbor boat chase and helicopter stunt in The Protector; and the Times Square scramble, Coney Island rollercoaster stunt, and airborne finale in Shakedown rank with the best action scenes of a James Bond film.

Glickenhaus was born on July 24, 1950, in New York City, and attended University of California Santa Barbara, Antioch College, and Sarah Lawrence. AFter a failed first feature, The Astrologer ( 1979), Glickenhaus surveyed theatre owners throughout the southern United States and crafted his second feature, The Exterminator ( 1980), to exhibitor demands. The result was a huge box-office hit both in the United States and abroad, and the director was able to follow up with action pictures of ever increasing budgets and more extensive set pieces. Critics have been harsh to Glickenhaus' movies, but audiences around the world have embraced them for their nonstop action and thrills. In 1987, Glickenhaus merged with Shapiro Entertainment to produce and distribute features for the international market. To his achievements as writer, producer, and director, Glickenhaus has added the role of studio executive.

I interviewed Jim Glickenhaus in January 1988, as he was editing his first film for Shapiro Glickenhaus Entertainment, Bluejean Cop, retitled Shakedown After its domestic acquisition by Universal Pictures.

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Film Directors on Directing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • John G. Avildsen 1
  • Tony Bill 21
  • Michael Cimino 37
  • Abel Ferrara 49
  • James Glickenhaus 57
  • Menahem Golan 75
  • Stuart Gordon 89
  • Ulu Grosbard 101
  • Anthony Harvey 115
  • Dennis Hopper 127
  • Ted Kotcheff 141
  • Adrian Lyne 159
  • John Milius 169
  • Alan Parker 183
  • Franc Roddam 195
  • Mark Rydell 209
  • Susan Seidelman 221
  • Joan Micklin Silver 231
  • James Toback 241
  • FrançOis Truffaut 259
  • Wim Wenders 269
  • Bibliography 279
  • Index 283
  • About the Author 301
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