Film Directors on Directing

By John Andrew Gallagher | Go to book overview

Wim Wenders

Wim Wenders' former Gray City, Inc., office overlooks 11 East 14th Street, one of the most famous addresses in film history, the site of D. W. Griffith's American Biograph studio. Wenders was delighted when I informed him of the proximity of Gray City to Biograph: "You're kidding! Whooh!" He stood and looked out the window at the carnival of street vendors and discount stores on 14th Street between Union Square and Fifth Avenue. The old Biograph brownstone has long since been replaced by a sprawling, dirty white condominium, obliterating the birthplace of film grammar. There used to be a plaque, but vandals ripped it down.

It's fitting that seventy years after Griffith used Manhattan as his personal back lot, Wenders and producer Chris Sievernich established Gray City near this historic location, for Wim Wenders appreciates our film heritage like few contemporary directors. Like the best of Bogdanovich, his movies can pay hommage to the masters yet remain fresh and original in their own rights. In his native Germany, Wenders was drawn by American "B" movies, and he has enjoyed creative associations with Sam Fuller and the late Nicholas Ray.

Born in Düsseldorf, Germany, on August 14, 1945, Wenders' educational background was in medicine and philosophy before moving to Paris to study painting. Back in Germany to attend Munich's Academy of Film and Television from 1967 to 1970, he also wrote film criticism. After winning some acclaim for a series of shorts, he and fourteen other young filmmakers formed Filmverlag Der Autoren in 1970 to produce and distribute their films. Through the Seventies, Wenders was an integral part of the New German Cinema, along with Werner Herzog, Volker Schlondorff, R. W. Fassbinder, and Wolfgang Petersen. His features Summer in the City ( 1970); The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick ( 1972), from the Peter Handke novel; Nathaniel Hawthorne The Scarlet Letter ( 1973); and the remarkable trio of

-269-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Film Directors on Directing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • John G. Avildsen 1
  • Tony Bill 21
  • Michael Cimino 37
  • Abel Ferrara 49
  • James Glickenhaus 57
  • Menahem Golan 75
  • Stuart Gordon 89
  • Ulu Grosbard 101
  • Anthony Harvey 115
  • Dennis Hopper 127
  • Ted Kotcheff 141
  • Adrian Lyne 159
  • John Milius 169
  • Alan Parker 183
  • Franc Roddam 195
  • Mark Rydell 209
  • Susan Seidelman 221
  • Joan Micklin Silver 231
  • James Toback 241
  • FrançOis Truffaut 259
  • Wim Wenders 269
  • Bibliography 279
  • Index 283
  • About the Author 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.