Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

By Henry A. Giroux; Roger I. Simon | Go to book overview

pedagogy which requires some articulation of knowledge and pleasure integral to student life walk a dangerous road. Too easily, perhaps, encouraging student voice can become a form of voyeurism or satisfy an ego-expansionism constituted on the pleasures of understanding those who appear as Other to us. So, we must be clear on the nature of the pedagogy we pursue. Popular cultue and social difference can be taken up by educators either as a pleasurable form of knowledge/power which allows for more effective individualizing and administration of physical and moral regulation or such practices can be understood as the terrain on which we must meet our students in a critical and empowering pedagogical encounter.

As teachers committed to the project of a critical pedagogy we have to read the ground of the popular for investments that distort or constrict human potentialities and those that give voice to unrealized possibilities. This is what the pedagogical struggle is all about -- opening up the material and discursive basis of particular ways of producing meaning and representing ourselves, our relations to others, and our relation to our environment so as to consider possibilities not yet realized. This is a utopian practice, to be embraced for its urgent necessity and scrutinized for its inherent limitations. John Berger captured the sentiment in his short story, "The Accordion Player."

Music demands obedience. It even demands obedience of the imagination when a melody comes to mind. You can think of nothing else. It's a kind of tyrant. In exchange it offers its own freedom. All bodies can boast about themselves with music. The old can dance as well as the young. Time is forgotten. And that night, from behind the silence of the last stars, we thought we heard the affirmation of a Yes.

" La Belle Jacqueline, once more!" the dressmaker shouted at Felix. "I love music! With music you can say everything!"

"You can't talk to a lawyer with music," Felix replied. 46


NOTES

A version of this chapter originally appeared in the journal Cultural Studies 2 ( Oct. 1988): 294-320.

1.
For example, see Ira Shor, Critical Teaching and Everyday Life ( Boston: South End, 1980); Paul Willis, Learning to Labor: How Working. Class Kids Get Working- Class Jobs ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1981); R. W. Connell et al., Making the Difference: Schools, Families, and Social Division ( Sydney: George Allen & Unwin, 1982); Michael Apple, Education and Power ( New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982); Henry A. Giroux, Theory and Resistance in Education (South Hadley, Mass.: Bergin & Garvey, 1983); Peter McLaren, Schooling as a Ritual Performance ( New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986).
2.
Examples of this work include Michael W. Apple and Lois Weis, eds., Ideology and Practice in Schooling ( Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1983); Margo Culley and Catherine Portuges, eds., Gendered Subjects: The Dynamics of FeministTeaching

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.