Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

By Henry A. Giroux; Roger I. Simon | Go to book overview

account the realities of state regulation and the limitations imposed by a corporate economy? Should these always be seen as limits?

For those of us who work within public education, why should a teacher act in a way that might be contrary to school board policy or directive? When would a teacher be justified in doing so? What would be the consequences? Should teachers be accountable to specific groups or an organized public sphere? In practice, how would/should this be done?

Given that critical pedagogy requires a substantial personal investment of time and energy, does it also require the near abandonment of a teacher's private life? How can one cope with the moments of depression and emotional disruption that come from a continual concern with the extent of injustice and violence in the world? How can we develop forms of collegial association that might support our efforts?


CONCLUSION

These questions should not suggest that they they have not been addressed either historically or in contemporary forms of social and educational theory. In fact, much of our own work has developed in response to many of the issues and questions we have presented above. What we want to re-emphasize is the openness and specificity, as well as the politics and ethics, at work in constantly reconstructing and addressing similar questions that emerge at different times from diverse voices under widely differing educational contexts. The notion of critical pedagogy begins with a degree of indignation, a vision of possibility, and an uncertainty; it demands that we constantly rethink and renew the work we have done as part of a wider theory of schooling as a form of cultural politics. Defining the connections between popular culture and critical pedagogy is only one part of this ongoing task, and our introductory comments on this issue have attempted to sketch our view of the work that lies ahead. We believe that the chapters in this book have contributed to this effort. We will have been successful if we have stimulated the search for new ways of thinking about the notion of popular culture and specifying its relation to a pedagogy of possibility.


NOTE

A version of this chapter first appeared in the Journal of Education 170(1): 9-26.


REFERENCES

Aronowitz Stanley, and Henry A. Giroux ( 1985) Education Under Seige. South Hadley, Mass.: Bergin & Garvey.

Bennett Tony ( 1986) "Popular Culture and the Turn to Gramsci." In Bennett, Mercer, and

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.