Psychology and Professional Practice: The Interface of Psychology and the Law

By Francis R. J. Fields; Rudy J. Horwitz | Go to book overview

3

THOMAS N. TUMILTY


The Clinical Psychologist

THE PROFESSION OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology and Psychiatry -- Training and Competency

The clinical psychologist, via the traditional team approach, has been involved most intimately with two other professions -- psychiatry and social work. Although the functions of these team members were once quite specific and delineated, such is no longer the case and the team approach is no longer reflected in the specialization of the past. More and more the functions of these three professions, as well as the training to carry out those functions, have come to overlap.

The public, as well as many professionals, is understandably confused about the training, qualifications, and limitations of these health providers. Few clinical psychologists in private practice can claim never to have had to explain to a perplexed client how they were different from a psychiatrist.

Several service professional disputes (primarily between clinical psycholU+00d ogists and psychiatrists) have arisen regarding professional boundary rights as clinical psychology has struggled for autonomy and freedom from the expectations engendered by the traditional "team approach." Fuel for the maintenance of such disputes has come partly from a lack of knowledge and recognition of the training and competencies of the respective professions, particularly psychology and psychiatry.

In the February 1977 issue of American Psychologist ( Kiesler), an editorial pointed out several of the distinguishing features of clinical psychology versus psychiatry, including differences in training and competency of its practitioners. In essence, a psychiatrist is a physician who, after undergraduate training in medical science, has gone through three to four years of medical school training leading to the M.D. degree plus a one-year internship. Actual training relevant to later professional practice comes through a three-year residency consisting primarily of actual treatment of patients

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Psychology and Professional Practice: The Interface of Psychology and the Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Titles from Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Bibliography xiii
  • 1: Independent Practice of Psychology 3
  • Conclusion 15
  • Bibliography 15
  • 2: Testing: The Armamentarium of Psychology 17
  • Summary and Concluding Remarks 30
  • Bibliography 31
  • 3: The Clinical Psychologist 33
  • Bibliography 55
  • 4: The Counseling Psychologist 59
  • Summary and Conclusions 69
  • 5: The School Psychologist 73
  • Cases Cited 90
  • Bibliography 90
  • 6: Ethical and Legal Issues in Community Psychology 93
  • Introduction 93
  • Bibliography 111
  • 7: The Clinical Neuropsychologist 113
  • 8: The Psychologist in the Employee Assistance Program Consortium 133
  • Bibliography 144
  • 9: A Judge Views Psychology 147
  • Notes 168
  • 10: A Jurist's Legal Opinion Regarding Practical Legal Issues Facing the Psychologist Practitioner 179
  • Appendix A Pennsylvania's Licensure Statute 187
  • Appendix B Ethical Principles of Psychologists 197
  • Index 205
  • About the Editors and Contributors 208
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