Scenery Design for the Amateur Stage

By Willard J. Friederich; John H. Fraser | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
Special Types of Scenery and Settings

MANY TYPES OF SCENERY OTHER THAN THE REGULATION box set used for most interiors have special advantages in setting plays that the designer often desperately needs. They may simplify the shifting problems, cut down on the expense, reduce labor, or add interest to the production through their novel interpretation and unique sense of fitness. They may be employed on any size stage, but it is usually for the small stage that they will be most useful and adaptable. The types described here are not the only ones, by any means, nor do they offer the only possible solutions to difficult setting problems. Just as these special types of scenery originally grew out of the necessity of overcoming specific obstacles, so many other types may grow out of the specific limitations which each designer must face.


THE UNIT SET

A unit set is a basic collection of flats and plastic pieces which may be used many times over by rearranging them to create different effects. There are several kinds of unit sets. In one type a simple collection of perhaps four or six pillars, several flats, and two or three platforms and step units may be rearranged to form literally dozens of combinations which may give an abstract kind of impression of any thing from a Greek temple to an underground prison. Their limitations depend only upon the versatility and imagination of the designer. With this kind of unit set, one must be careful in selecting his set dressing. Too realistic furniture and dressing may seem an

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