The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society

By Carol Aisha Blackshire-Belay | Go to book overview

27
German-Writing Authors in Israel

MARGARITA PAZI

Israeli authors writing in German have been and still are facing a difficult situation: they are not just authors writing in a different language; the language they use to express their prose and poetry is not frowned upon anymore but is still invariably tainted with associations of inhumane cruelty, piles of helplessly murdered humans, and the symbol of horror: Ausschwitz. Thus for the German-speaking immigrants, the language problem, being the most difficult adjustment, turned out to be a threefold problem: a practical, a cultural, as well as an emotional problem. 1

After many quarrels and considerations in this little country, declared in 1917 as the mother country of the Jews by the Balfour Declaration, Irvit (modern Hebrew) had succeeded over Yiddish; the objections of the Orthodox against the ordinary daily use of the sacred language were countered with convincing arguments especially by pointing at oriental immigrants to whom the Bible and its language were an emotional haven. The holy language became the language of the pioneers. Words and expressions used for centuries to convey religious beliefs were now used on an everyday basis. The immigrants from Eastern Europe did not have a language problem since they had been exposed to the language by their traditional upbringing, the religious schools. The situation was somewhat different for immigrants from Central and Western Europe, who had to overcome existential difficulties, came from diverse language backgrounds, and could therefore only rarely pursue intensive studies of this rather difficult language, which was in its syntax and its alphabet so different from their own languages.

To learn Ivrit was encouraged and an occasional fallback into the mother tongue was tolerated as a transition phase -- as long as it was not German. Since 1933 German was a frowned-upon language in this country and this image stuck with it for decades. Often this view was shared by German immigrants too, for whom the language triggered bad memories.

The spiritual and cultural isolation of the new immigrants, including those to whom German was only the best-known foreign language, was the result

-275-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.