The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society

By Kenneth Paul O'Brien; Lynn Hudson Parsons | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is a product of "Lest We Forget," a Public Humanities Project commemorating the 50th anniversary of America's entry into World War II, held in the Rochester ( New York) area between October 1991 and December 1992. It was funded by a $250,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and sponsored by the State University of New York (SUNY) College at Brockport. It included a public lecture series hosted by Rochester's Strong Museum, a combined museum exhibit involving the Strong and several other cooperating institutions, a film festival hosted by the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, and a series of three academic symposia hosted by the College at Brockport. The chapters presented herein represent the editors' choice of the more compelling of those papers, consistent with the theme of the volume.

"Lest We Forget" was made possible through the collaboration of several dozen individuals and institutions. We are indebted first and foremost to the NEH, which provided both support for the project itself and for a critical planning conference in early 1990, without which the rest of the project might never have taken off. We--and the readers of this volume--have a debt of gratitude to Wilsonia Cherry, Senior Program Officer at the NEH, who provided help and counsel throughout the entire three-year period of planning and implementation.

Four nationally known scholars-- D'Ann Campbell, Walter LaFeber, Leo Ribuffo, and Melvin Small--took time off from their crowded academic schedules to act as consultants, advisers, and contributors to the entire project. Rollie Adams, President and chief executive officer of the Strong Museum, was involved with the planning virtually from the start and was most generous in his encouragement and overall support. So too was John Van de Wetering, President of the SUNY College at Brockport, who offered encouragement when the project was but a gleam in our eyes. Our colleague Joan Shelley Rubin did a superb job in coordinating the combined museum exhibits, as did Carolyn Vacca, the Deputy County Historian, who shared in every step of the planning

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.