Studies in Perception and Action V: Tenth International Conference on Perception and Action: Aug. 8-13, 1999, Edinburgh, Scotland

By Madeleine A. Grealy; James A. Thomson et al. | Go to book overview

Studies in Perception and Action V MA. Grealy & J. A. Thomson (Eds.) © 1999 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.


Reliability And Accuracy In Size Judgments Of Objects And Oneself

Thomas R. Alley

Department of Psychology, Clemson University, USA

A concern for estimates of linear extent arises in many contexts, including basic research in perception (e.g., judgments of distance), clinical studies (e.g., judgments of "body image") and industry. From an ecological perspective, size and distance are most meaningful in terms of body-scaled potential activities. Natural selection and everyday activities guarantee that humans are able to judge linear extents under many conditions with sufficient accuracy to support a great variety of actions. For perception to serve action, distance and size must be perceived in body-scaled terms, and to do this we must be able to accurately judge limb lengths, maximum body width, and other aspects of body size. In apparent contradiction of this expectation stands a sizeable literature suggesting that many people grossly mis-perceive their body size. This literature on "body-image" is fraught with problems, including questionable measurement techniques, and rarely includes comparison of accuracy in body image with that of other objects ( Schlundt & Johnson, 1990; Thompson, 1996).

This paper reports results obtained with two new techniques that allow precise assessment of judgments of perceived or remembered linear dimensions. The primary technique utilizes observer-controlled projection of a laser beam to vary the distance between the beam and a reference line. The second technique involves adjustment of a web belt to indicate circumference. To test the usability and reliability of these methods, 11 judgments of size were made on two occasions one week apart for targets that varied in familiarity and shape.

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Perception and Action V: Tenth International Conference on Perception and Action: Aug. 8-13, 1999, Edinburgh, Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.