Human Bullets: A Soldier's Story of Port Arthur

By Tadayoshi Sakurai | Go to book overview

LIFE OUT OF DEATH

THE day of the 24th of August dawned upon a battle-ground covered with the dead and wounded of both sides. I discovered that the man in my arms was Kensuke Ono, a soldier whom I had trained. He was wounded in the right eye and pierced through the side. Thinking that he could not live, he had called my name and offered to die with me. Poor, dear fellow! My left arm that embraced him was covered with dark red clots of blood, which was running over Ono's neck. Ono removed my arm, quietly pulled out his bandages, and bound up my left arm. Thus I lay surrounded by the enemy and seriously wounded; there seemed no slightest hope of my escape. If I did not expire then, it was certain that I should soon be in the enemy's hands, which meant a misfortune far more intolerable than death. My heart yearned to commit suicide before such a disgrace should befall me, but I had no weapon with me, no hand that could help me in the act. Tears of regret choked me.

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Human Bullets: A Soldier's Story of Port Arthur
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction to the Bison Books Edition v
  • Contents xv
  • Editor's Preface xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Author's Preface xxiii
  • Mobilization 3
  • Our Departure 14
  • The Voyage 22
  • A Dangerous Landing 27
  • The Value of Port Arthur 37
  • The Battle of Nanshan 42
  • Nanshan After the Battle 52
  • Digging and Scouting 63
  • The First Captives 70
  • Our First Battle at Waitu- Shan 77
  • The Occupation of Kenzan 84
  • Counter-Attacks on Kenzan 89
  • On the Defensive 100
  • Life in Camp 110
  • Some Brave Men and Their Memorial 118
  • The Battle of Taipo-Shan 126
  • The Occupation of Taipo-Shan 137
  • The Field After the Battle 147
  • The First Aid Station 158
  • Following Up the Victory 166
  • The Storming of Taku-Shan 174
  • Sun Flag on Taku-Shan 184
  • Promotion and Farewells 194
  • The Beginning of the General Assault 204
  • A Rain of Human Bullets 214
  • The Forlorn Hope 227
  • Life Out of Death 239
  • Appendices 257
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