Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration

By A. K. McClure; James A. Rawley | Go to book overview

LINCOLN AND CAMERON.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN had more varied and complicated relations with Simon Cameron than with any other Pennsylvanian during his Presidential term. Indeed, Cameron fills more pages in the annals of Pennsylvania politics than any citizen of the State since the organization of our government. He is the only man who was four times elected to the United States Senate by the Pennsylvania Legislature until his son attained the same distinction as his successor, and he would have won a fifth election without a serious contest had he not voluntarily resigned to assure the succession to his son. Without great popular following, he was the most conspicuous of all our Pennsylvania politicians, measured by the single standard of success in obtaining political honors and power. He was first elected to the Senate in 1845 to succeed Buchanan, who had been transferred to the Polk Cabinet. The tariff of 1842 was then a vital issue in Pennsylvania, and Cameron was known as a positive protectionist. The Legislature was Democratic, and had nominated the late Chief Justice Woodward with apparent unanimity to succeed Buchanan; but Cameron organized a bolt from the Democratic party, commanded the solid Whig vote on the tariff issue, and was thus elected. The Senate to which he was chosen was Democratic, and he exhibited his peculiar power over that body when he served in it by the rejection of

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Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction 7
  • Preface 17
  • Contents 21
  • List of Illustrations 25
  • Lincoln in 1860. 27
  • A Visit to Lincoln. 44
  • Lincoln's Characteristics. 72
  • Lincoln in Politics. 85
  • Lincoln and Emancipation. 98
  • Lincoln and Hamlin. 115
  • Lincoln and Chase. 132
  • Lincoln and Cameron. 147
  • Lincoln and Stanton. 170
  • Lincoln and Grant. 189
  • Lincoln and Mcclellan. 208
  • Lincoln and Sherman. 226
  • Lincoln and Curtin. 248
  • Lincoln and Stevens. 277
  • Lincoln and Greeley. 312
  • Our Unrewarded Heroes. 355
  • The Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. 423
  • Appendix. 457
  • Index. 483
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