Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration

By A. K. McClure; James A. Rawley | Go to book overview

LINCOLN AND GRANT.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN and Ulysses S. Grant were entire strangers to each other personally until the 9th of March, 1864, when Lincoln handed Grant his commission as Lieutenant-General, which made him three days later Commander-in-Chief of all the armies of the Union. Although Grant entered the army as a citizen of Lincoln's own State, he had resided there only a little more than a year. When he retired from the army by resignation on the 31st of July, 1854, as a captain, he selected Missouri as his home and settled on a farm near St. Louis. He had won promotion at the battles of Molino del Rey and Chapultepec in the Mexican War, and was brevetted for special gallantry. During the nearly seven years between his retirement from the army and re-entering the military service at the beginning of the civil war he had done little or nothing to make himself known to fame. He had moved from Missouri to Galena early in 1860 to improve his worldly condition by accepting a salary of $600 from his two brothers, who were then engaged in the leather business. After remaining with them for a year his salary was advanced to $800, and in a letter to a friend he exhibited his gratification at his business success and expressed the hope of reaching what then seemed to be his highest ambition--a partnership in the firm. His life in Galena was quiet and unobtrusive as was Grant's habit under

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Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction 7
  • Preface 17
  • Contents 21
  • List of Illustrations 25
  • Lincoln in 1860. 27
  • A Visit to Lincoln. 44
  • Lincoln's Characteristics. 72
  • Lincoln in Politics. 85
  • Lincoln and Emancipation. 98
  • Lincoln and Hamlin. 115
  • Lincoln and Chase. 132
  • Lincoln and Cameron. 147
  • Lincoln and Stanton. 170
  • Lincoln and Grant. 189
  • Lincoln and Mcclellan. 208
  • Lincoln and Sherman. 226
  • Lincoln and Curtin. 248
  • Lincoln and Stevens. 277
  • Lincoln and Greeley. 312
  • Our Unrewarded Heroes. 355
  • The Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. 423
  • Appendix. 457
  • Index. 483
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