Life of Daniel Webster - Vol. 2

By George Ticknor Curtis | Go to book overview

INDEX.
ABBOTT, Dr. BENJAMIN, principal of Exeter Academy, i. 18.
ABBOTT, GEORGE J., letters of, relating to Mr. Webster's last days, ii. 666, 683, 686; with Mr. Webster during his last illness, 634.
ABERDEEN, Lord, becomes the English Secretary of Foreign Affairs, ii. 83; apprises Mr. Everett of Lord Ashburton's appointment, 94; his views of the Creole case, 99, 104-106; his views on the construction of the Treaty of Washington, respecting the right of search, 149, 150; remarks on the treaty in the House of Lords, 159.
Abolitionists, agitation of, begun, i. 525; formation of a political part, ii. 230; advocate the dissolution of the Union, 399; Mr. Webster's opinion of, 405.
ADAMS, JOHN, letter to Mr. Webster, i. 193; death of, 274; eulogy on, and Jefferson, 274-280; Mr. Jefferson's remarks on, 589; the speech imputed to, in Mr. Webster's eulogy, ii. 293-296.
ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY, candidate for presidency, i. 218; vote received, 235; chosen in the House, 236; nominates commissioners to Congress of Panama, 265; his statements concerning opponents of the Embargo, 332; his relations with Mr. Webster in 1841, ii. 56; his advice to Mr. Webster about remaining in the Cabinet in 1841, 81, note; remarks on Mr. Ingersoll's charges against Mr. Webster, 269.
ADAMS, SAMUEL, Mr. Jefferson's remarks on, i. 588
Address of Massachusetts Whigs in favor of Mr. Webster's nomination in 1852, ii. 579; of New-York Whigs in the same behalf, 582.
AIKEN, WILLIAM, letter from, i. 367.
Albany, city of, described by Mr. Webster in 1805, i. 68; visited by Mr. Webster in 1833, 461; speech at, in 1844, ii. 243; address to the young men of, 510.
ALEXANDER, Emperor of Russia, address on capture of Moscow, i. 129; offer of mediation between Great Britain and the United States, 133.
ALLEN, CHARLES, his charges of corruption against Mr. Webster, ii. 492-496; reiteration of the charges in 1852, 497.
ALLEN, WILLIAM (of the Senate), remarks of, on the construction or the Treaty of Washington, ii. 153; proposes termination of the joint occupancy of Oregon, 259.
Alton, town of, reception of Mr. Webster in 1837, i. 563.
AMIN BEY, Turkish commissioner, entertained by Mr. Webster, ii. 478; dinner to, in Boston, 483.
ANDERSON, RICHARD C., commissioner to Panama, i. 265.
Andover, Mass., Whig Convention at, in 1844, ii. 226; Mr. Webster's speech at the same, 227. 228.
Annapolis, Md., speech at, in 1852, ii. 599.
Annuity, given to Mr. Webster in 1846, ii. 284, et seq.
Antimasons, origin of, i. 392; form a political party, 393; their designs in 1835, 508; Mr. Webster's relations with them, 509; convention at Harrisburg, 511.
Antislavery, beginning of the agitation, i. 525; letter from Society to Mr. Webster, 525.
"Appeal to the Old Whigs," early pamphlet of Mr. Webster's, i. 79.
APPLETON, CONSTANCE MARY, Mr. Webster's grandchild; her death, ii. 375; her epitaph, 332.
APPLETON, SAMUEL, his generosity to Mr. Webster, ii. 692, 693.
APPLETON, SAMUEL APPLETON, engaged to Miss Webster, ii. 5; follows Mr. Webster to Europe, 5; marries Miss Julia Webster, 20; letter to, on the death of his child, 375; with Mr. Webster during his last days, 696; present at the death-bed, 701.
APPLETON, Mrs. S. A. ( Julia Webster), tries to dissuade her father from taking office, ii. 49. illness of, 315. et seq. ; letters from, 316, 317; letter to, 317; death of, 326; her funeral, 327; her father's memoranda concerning, 330; epitaph of, 332.
ARCHER, WILLIAM S. (or the Senate), remarks on the Treaty of Washington, ii. 153; on the acquisition of territory, 307.
ASHBURTON, Lord, his Government determines to send him to settle the difficulties with the United States, ii. 94; the object of his mission, 98; opens the negotiations on the boundary question, 103; his plan of settlement, 104; humorous notes to Mr. Webster during the negotiations, 113; his reply to the propositions of the Maine commissioners, 114; objects to money compensation to Maine and Massachusetts, 117; his letters on the right of search, extradition of fugitives, the Creole case, etc., 119,120, 122; reply to Mr. Webster on impressment, 123, 124; the value of his services in these negotiations, 124; leaves Washington, 139; receives a public dinner in New York, 140; visits Marshfield, 140; farewell note to Mr. Webster, 147; his remarks on the Treaty of Washington in the House of Lords, 151; letter from, referring to the "battle of the maps," 167.
ASHMUN, GEORGE, remarks on Mr. Ingersoll's charges against Mr. Webster, ii. 278, 279

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Life of Daniel Webster - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Errata. *
  • Contents of Volume Ii. iii
  • Chapter Xxv. 1838-1839. 1
  • Chapter XXVI - 1839-1840. 28
  • Chapter Xxvii. 1840-1841. 47
  • Chapter Xxviii. 1841-1842. 94
  • Chapter Xxix. 1842-1843. 130
  • Chapter Xxx. 1843-1844. 206
  • Chapter Xxxi. 1844-1845. 246
  • Chapter XXXII - 1845-1846. 252
  • Chapter Xxxiii. 1846-1847. 298
  • Chapter Xxxiv. 1847-1848. 313
  • Chapter XXXV - 1848-1849. 350
  • Chapter Xxxvi. 1849-1850. 381
  • Chapter Xxxvii. 1850-1851. 466
  • Chapter XXXVIII - 1851-1852. 566
  • Index. 706
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