tar. Let's see just how everyday it is.The National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research provides the following data:
The cumulative Australia-wide death toll from AIDS as of September 1993 was 3017.
The number of AIDS deaths per year peaked in 1991, at 556; in 1993 it fell to 364.
The cumulative number of AIDS cases as of September 1993 was 4354. About 60% occur in Sydney.
Infection peaked in 1983-4, when between 3000 and 4500 individuals became infected. The rate of infection since 1988 is estimated at 600 per year. The current infection rate is estimated at 3.5 new infections per 100 000 persons. 98% are male.

Comparing AIDS as a cause of death with other causes, we find that in 1993 it was slightly more than the number of homicides, about a sixth the number of road fatalities, and about a fifth the number of suicides. It is not in the same league with cardiovascular disease (41 127 deaths, 1991) or cancer (31 284 deaths, 1991).

This profile holds right through OECD countries, albeit at lower rates than Australia. Germany, its population 80 million, had 9000 AIDS cases as of 1993, while at the same date the UK, with 57 Million, had 7000 AIDS cases. Even in the US, where the incidence of the disease is highest, the annual mortality from AIDS is just over half the mortality from hospital-acquired infections. Yet there is no public outcry about the lethal hospital epidemic.

The virus is not a bushfire spreading through Australia or the Pacific region. The cumulative HIV+ diagnosis in the Western Pacific as of September 1993 is as follows:

Australia 17 568
Cambodia 178
Hong Kong 289
Japan 2 731
Malaysia 6 225
New Zealand 884
Philippines 459
Singapore 190
Vietnam 792

-37-

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The AIDS Mirage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Frontlines i
  • Contents 3
  • 1 - Why We Need Aids 4
  • 2 - A Virus Invades the Mind 11
  • 4 - Donald Francis Invents a Viral Epidemic 19
  • 5 - Aids Mania 37
  • 7 - Medicine and Human Suffering 52
  • Further Reading 59
  • Glossary 60
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