GLOSSARY
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). A disorder of immunity characterised by abnormalities of immunoregulation and opportunistic infections.
Antibody. A component of the immune system produced in response to exposure to antigens. Antibodies help eliminate infectious microorganisms in the body.
Antigens. A foreign molecule that stimulates the production of antibodies.
AZT (azathioprine, also called zidovudine). A powerful immunosuppressive agent used to slow the progression of AIDS diseases by preventing viral replication. The drug was originally developed to treat autoimmune diseases and to suppress rejection of renal transplants. AZT is associated with increased risk of squamous carcinomas of skin and with lymphoma, and predisposes patients to opportunistic infections.
Cell-mediated immunity. A defence mechanism involving the coordinated activity of two subpopulations of T lymphocytes, helper T4 cells and killer T8 cells. Helper T cells produce substances that stimulate and regulate other cells of the immune system.
Cofactor. A factor other than the basic causative agent of a disease that increases the likelihood of the disease developing.
Cytomegalovirus (CMV). A virus belonging to the herpes virus group, commonly associated with infections of patients who have received medical treatment involving immune suppression. In AIDS patients, CMV may produce pneumonia and inflammation in various organs.
Cytopathic. Disease-induced change to cells.
ELISA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a test used to detect antibodies against HIV in blood samples.
Encephalopathy. Any degenerative disease of the brain. It is a major AIDS- defining illness although it is not necessarily caused by an infectious agent.
Gay men. A subgroup of homosexual men who identify themselves with the gay community sharing a common identity.
Haemophilia. A rare, hereditary bleeding disorder of males due to deficiency of Factor VIII blood-clotting proteins.
Health. The state of physical and mental well-being, characterised by the absence of disease and infirmity.
HHV-6. A ubiquitous virus of the herpes family proposed as a cofactor with HIV in the aetiology of AIDS.
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). A nine-kilobyte retrovirus of the lentivirus family, believed to be cytopathic of T and B lymphocytes and haematopoietic stem cells, and associated with two types of cancer, encephalopathy, and 26 opportunistic infections.
Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HLTV-III). The name given in 1984 to isolates of the supposed AIDS-related retrovirus, called 'HIV' since 1986. The isolate was not, as originally believed, of the HLTV family.

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The AIDS Mirage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Frontlines i
  • Contents 3
  • 1 - Why We Need Aids 4
  • 2 - A Virus Invades the Mind 11
  • 4 - Donald Francis Invents a Viral Epidemic 19
  • 5 - Aids Mania 37
  • 7 - Medicine and Human Suffering 52
  • Further Reading 59
  • Glossary 60
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