French Interests and Policies in the Far East

By Roger Levy; Andrew Roth et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
FRENCH ECONOMIC RELATIONS WITH CHINA

Franco-Chinese Trade

The number of French citizens living in the countries of the Far East and the Pacific, according to the Annuaire Statistique for 1938, was estimated in 1931 as follows:

China 5,000
Straits Settlements and Malaya 400
Hongkong 250
Japan and Korea 600
Siam 400
Philippines and Hawaii 300
New Zealand 500
Australia 3,000
Netherlands East Indies 300
Total. 10,750

In French Oceania there were 36,000 French citizens, of whom 17,000 were native Oceanians.

In considering the commercial interests of France in China1 we must distinguish between the exchange of goods between the two countries and the investments of French commercial houses established in China. China would offer enormous possibilities to foreign trade if the purchasing power of its population were greater, but it would be a gross error to attribute to the present Chinese market a capacity for absorbing foreign goods comparable to that of the poorest European markets. According to League of Nations statistics, the per capita value, in U. S. gold dollars, of foreign trade was

____________________
1
Before studying the present trade of France and Indo-China with the countries of the Far East and the Pacific, it may be well to mention the first tentative trade relations between France and China. On October 5, 1699, the Amphitrite of the firm of Jourdan, Decoulange & Co. entered the harbor at Canton, the first French ship to reach China. The owners of the Amphitrite formed the Royal China Co. Others followed their example, and voyages to the Orient became quite frequent for about fifteen years. Then trade relations ceased until the nineteenth century.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
French Interests and Policies in the Far East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.