French Interests and Policies in the Far East

By Roger Levy; Andrew Roth et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
FRANCE AND THE SINO-JAPANESE CONFLICT

France in the Pacific

M. Albert Sarraut said on November 25, 1936,

The subject of France in the Pacific may be approached from two different angles. It may be viewed as a geographical, political and economic survey of a rich and varied patrimony which is the source of French political, intellectual, and moral influence in the Far East. Such a study would be very much like an academic lecture which is educational in an amiable and pleasant manner. But the rigors of an uneasy age suggest a second way of dealing with the subject. What is to be the future of this patrimony of ours? By what dangers is it threatened, and how can we overcome them?

In the foregoing chapters certain of the first aspects of the problem have been briefly reviewed, bringing us to the second, which is political in nature. Some French diplomats were awake to the dangers more than thirty years ago, when they wrote that, in spite of the resistance which Japan's ambition would meet in China, her influence would always be very great:

In Far Eastern politics Japan will, as Europe must recognize, remain a dominant force, and it is chiefly upon Japan that peace or war will depend.


The French Concession at Shanghai, 1937

During the first period of the Sino-Japanese hostilities ( July, August and September 1937) the position of the French Concession at Shanghai was greatly endangered.1 Like the other French concessions in China, the Shanghai Concession is under the authority of the French Ambassador, who also controls the French land and sea forces stationed in China. The most important element of French government in the Chinese concessions is the deliberative assembly, composed of representatives of the foreign and Chinese populations living in the concessions. In Shanghai this assembly is presided over by the French consul-general who has very extensive powers. The police force

____________________
1
China and Japan, London, 1938. The French Concession is distinct from the International Settlement; its administration is French and therefore independent.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
French Interests and Policies in the Far East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.