VII
MARTIAL INTERLUDE

THE WINTER and early spring in Peking in 1928 were uneventful in a news sense, although there were frequent alarms, even mild panics, and rumor predicted all manner of dire happenings certain to accompany the coming of summer.

The Nationalists were successfully on the march northward, and although early 1928 brought no repetition of anything remotely resembling the Nanking outrages of March 24th the year before, there were isolated cases of murder, looting, and violence, and the attitude of the huge armies, excited by victory after victory, remained violently anti-foreign.

Most of the Treaty Powers took precautions in North China during 1927, similar to those taken at Shanghai. Early in 1928 the foreign defense forces scattered between Peking, Tientsin and Chingwantao totaled nearly 12,000 officers and men. These were comprised of soldiers and Marines of the United States, Britain, France, and Italy. Japanese forces at Tientsin numbered nearly 1,000 men additional.

At Tientsin the United States maintained a whole brigade of Marines, in excess of 4,000 men, under Brigadier General Smedley Butler, then at the height of his fame. Butler's force had splendid equipment, including tanks and field guns, and he was the only foreign commander in North China with his own air force, which numbered twenty planes. In addition to the Marines, the 15th Infantry Regiment was stationed at

-66-

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My Life in China, 1926-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Book I. China Awakes 3
  • Book I. China Awakes 3
  • II - Imperialist Outpost 10
  • III - Chungking's Origins 16
  • IV - Summer of Discontent 35
  • V - Peking, Old Style 43
  • VI - A Plum Lands in My Lap 55
  • VII - Martial Interlude 66
  • VIII - Off to the Wars 73
  • IX - The Life That Was 89
  • X - Officially an Outcast 102
  • XI - A Truce and a Perfidy 120
  • XII - Intolerance and Deception 138
  • Book Ii. Japan Marches 147
  • Book Ii. Japan Marches 147
  • II - Pattern for Conquest 161
  • III - Dirty Yen and Itching Palms 174
  • IV - Thirty-Five Thousand Die 186
  • V - The Years Between 194
  • VI - Trying Conspiracy First 212
  • VII - Summer, 1936 217
  • VIII - Betrayal and Triumph 226
  • IX - Trouble with Moscow 236
  • X - Chiang Kai-Shek Listened 242
  • XI - Terror and Death 257
  • XII - Japan's Worst "Bad Boy" 268
  • XIII - The Heavy Hand of Power 286
  • XIV - Ominous Interlude 294
  • Book Iii. the World at War 301
  • Book Iii. the World at War 301
  • II - Faint Hope for Peace 311
  • III - Another Feeler 320
  • IV - The Nipps Get Nasty 324
  • V - Confusion in High Places 332
  • VI - Terrorism 336
  • VII - Plot and Counterplot 348
  • VIII - Disillusion and Dismay 354
  • IX - China for the Chinese 363
  • X - Europe Will Be Easy, by Comparison 375
  • Epilogue 383
  • Index 391
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