X
EUROPE WILL BE EASY, BY COMPARISON

IT REQUIRED the American public (and most of Congress) more than a year and a half after Pearl Harbor finally to awaken to a realization of the fact that the hardest and probably the longest and most costly phase of the war will be taken up with our eventual all-out drives to defeat Japan and bring that nation to unconditional surrender.

During the first eighteen or twenty months of the conflict there was a light-hearted tendency to believe that once Hitler had been defeated Japan would quickly be humbled to the dust under crushing blows from the allied forces of the United Nations, and that Russia would either help us to beat Japan or would at least permit American air forces to use Siberian landing fields.

Continuing alarms from Australia, and a realization of Japanese atrocities and brutalities in the making of war, gradually served to turn public opinion to a more sane evaluation of our Far East difficulties. Finally we reluctantly acknowledged to ourselves that the victories of Midway, the Coral Sea, Guadalcanal, and New Guinea were essentially all defensive victories. The seven months of bitter and costly fighting required to take Guadalcanal, and the fact that it took the American and Australian forces under General MacArthur 117 days to annihilate 15,000 Japanese in the Buna-Gona areas, awakened us to the size and difficulties of the task ahead in the Far Pacific. The

-375-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
My Life in China, 1926-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Book I. China Awakes 3
  • Book I. China Awakes 3
  • II - Imperialist Outpost 10
  • III - Chungking's Origins 16
  • IV - Summer of Discontent 35
  • V - Peking, Old Style 43
  • VI - A Plum Lands in My Lap 55
  • VII - Martial Interlude 66
  • VIII - Off to the Wars 73
  • IX - The Life That Was 89
  • X - Officially an Outcast 102
  • XI - A Truce and a Perfidy 120
  • XII - Intolerance and Deception 138
  • Book Ii. Japan Marches 147
  • Book Ii. Japan Marches 147
  • II - Pattern for Conquest 161
  • III - Dirty Yen and Itching Palms 174
  • IV - Thirty-Five Thousand Die 186
  • V - The Years Between 194
  • VI - Trying Conspiracy First 212
  • VII - Summer, 1936 217
  • VIII - Betrayal and Triumph 226
  • IX - Trouble with Moscow 236
  • X - Chiang Kai-Shek Listened 242
  • XI - Terror and Death 257
  • XII - Japan's Worst "Bad Boy" 268
  • XIII - The Heavy Hand of Power 286
  • XIV - Ominous Interlude 294
  • Book Iii. the World at War 301
  • Book Iii. the World at War 301
  • II - Faint Hope for Peace 311
  • III - Another Feeler 320
  • IV - The Nipps Get Nasty 324
  • V - Confusion in High Places 332
  • VI - Terrorism 336
  • VII - Plot and Counterplot 348
  • VIII - Disillusion and Dismay 354
  • IX - China for the Chinese 363
  • X - Europe Will Be Easy, by Comparison 375
  • Epilogue 383
  • Index 391
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 396

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.