Government Organization in War Time and After: A Survey of the Federal Civil Agencies Created for the Prosecution of the War

By William Franklin Willoughby | Go to book overview

times of peace. Upon the entrance of the United States into war it became imperative.

This was due not merely to the magnitude and complexity of the task that was thrown upon the Government, but also to the unusual conditions under which the war had to be fought. These conditions consisted in the fact that the resources of the country in both men and material were utterly inadequate to meet the demands made upon them. There was a shortage of man power, or at least of man power of the character required, of transportation facilities, both on land and water, of fuel, food, and almost every commodity required to meet the munition, equipment, and other needs of our military and naval forces. This shortage necessitated not only the taking of immediate steps for removing it, but the determination of the use to which should be put such resources as were available and the conditions under which they should be acquired.

Under these conditions it became necessary that the Government should at once undertake to do the following things: (1) formulate as definitely as circumstances would permit its military programme; (2) determine the total requirements in respect to all classes of men and material called for by such programme; (3) ascertain the extent to which these requirements could be met under existing conditions; (4) take steps to insure the creation of new facilities for meeting any shortage thus revealed; (5) determine the use to which such facilities and resources as were available should be put; and (6) fix the prices or compensation rates that should be paid for such services and supplies.

We have given this brief analysis of the purely administrative phase of the problem of the conduct of the war in order to make clear the need for the creation of

-4-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Government Organization in War Time and After: A Survey of the Federal Civil Agencies Created for the Prosecution of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.