Piety in the Public School: Trends and Issues in the Relationship between Religion and the Public School in the United States

By Robert Michaelsen | Go to book overview

II
The Public School as "Established Church"?

". . . of necessity the state in its public-education system is and always has been teaching religion. It does so because the well-being of the nation and the state demands this foundation of shared eliefs. . . . In this sense the public-school system of the United States is its established church."

-- Sidney Mead1

"The work of public education is with us to a large degree, a piece of religious work."

-- Ellwood P. Cubberley, 19092

"Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments."

-- The Supreme Court of the United States3

It has become fashionable in some circles to advocate the "fourth r" in education -- meaning religion. The phraseology is perhaps more clever than perceptive. American public education has never stopped with the three r's. And the fourth r has sometimes been first, has sometimes underlain the rest, and has sometimes, ambivalently, been both an "in r" and an "out r."

The pupil in the public school has been taught to read, to write, and to do his sums in order that be might be something -- that he might be a pious person, or a moral man or a loyal citizen. The content of the reading and writing, and at times even the arithmetic, has usually reflected these ends. The early readers and spellers were saturated with religious, moral, and

____________________
1
The Lively Experintent, p. 68.
2
Changing Conceptions of Education New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1909), p. 68. Cubberley was one of the most influential early-twentieth- century historians of American public education.
3
Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S.483, 493 ( 1954). This is the famous school-desegregation case.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Piety in the Public School: Trends and Issues in the Relationship between Religion and the Public School in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.