The Life and Times of William Howard Taft: A Biography - Vol. 1

By Henry F. Pringle | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII
THE LONELY HOUSE

HE first weeks after March 4, 1909, were particularly strange. He sat at a vast desk which was the desk of the President of the United States. He was told, very politely, that he must walk ahead of everyone else-- even Mrs. Taft-- when he entered a room. He must leave every gathering first, so that the others could depart. They called him Mr. President. "As I see it, Mr. President . . ." began the visitors who swarmed, in the main to get jobs. "Now in my judgment, Mr. President . . ." said the senators, who wanted many things in addition to jobs for their followers. "I have the honor, Mr. President, to report that My Government inclines to the position said, sonorously, the elaborately dressed ambassadors.

Toward the end of his first week in the White House, President Taft went horseback riding with Captain Butt, whom he had retained as chief aide. W. Bourke Cochran of New York was invited to join them. He asked the President, as their horses stepped out together, how he liked the awe-inspiring post which was now his.

"I hardly know, yet," said Taft. "When I hear someone say Mr. President, I look around expecting to see Roosevelt."

At dinner, a few nights later, he kept referring to Theodore Roosevelt as "the President," and this did not please Mrs. Taft. What he obviously meant to say, she pointed out, was "the ex-President."

"I suppose I do, dear," he answered, "but he will always be the President to me, and I can never think of him as anything else."1

Yet it was to be impossible ever again to lean on "my dear Theodore" for guidance and advice. Roosevelt was sailing for his African hunt on March 23 and when he returned in June, 1910, misunderstanding and doubt were chill auguries of the quarrel which would send Woodrow Wilson to the White House. President Taft delegated Archie Butt to present his departing friend with a

____________________
1
Butt Archie, Taft and Roosevelt, Vol. I, pp. 9, 14.

-399-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life and Times of William Howard Taft: A Biography - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.