The Eighteen-Sixties: Essays by Fellows of the Royal Society of Literature

By John Drinkwater | Go to book overview

GEORGE WHYTE-MELVILLE

By The Hon. Sir John Fortescue

For two hundred years England was governed by her country gentlemen, and it was under their guidance that the British Empire was built up. Their sons, mostly their younger sons, supplied officers to Navy and Army, and they themselves looked to the paying of the bill. They were a curious lot, of many grades and conditions. At the top were the great magnates, mostly, though not all of them, peers, but these were often mere upstarts of Henry VIII's time, and there were numbers of little squires who could and did boast of longer pedigrees and longer possession of coat-armour. The pride of all these squires was immense, and their faith in the virtue of coat-armour unquenchable. The eighteenth century was their golden age. Some never moved from their estates from year's end to year's end. The knights of the shire of course went up to London for the Parliamentary session, and the wealthier made the Grand Tour abroad, learned French and Italian and bought pictures, statuary and books. When a great magnate started for London, his horses, coaches and waggons filled the road and flooded the inns. But roads were so bad that the richest as well as the poorest made most of their journeys in the saddle.

One characteristic, which was shared by all alike, was passion for sport -- and by sport I mean sport in the old sense of hunting, shooting, fishing, hawking, horse-

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Eighteen-Sixties: Essays by Fellows of the Royal Society of Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Sir Henry Taylor 1
  • Arthur Hugh Clough 20
  • The Early Novels of Wilkie Collins 51
  • Exit Planché -- Enter Gilbert 102
  • Punch in the 'sixties 149
  • Historians in the 'sixties - A New Era 175
  • Eneas Sweetland Dallas 201
  • George Whyte-Melville 224
  • Science in the 'sixties 245
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 282

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.