American Trade Policy: 1923-1995

By Edward S. Kaplan | Go to book overview

session. Public hearings were to begin on January 7 and last until the end of February. The committee made public the reasons for tariff revision, stating that since the passage of the Fordney-McCumber Tariff in 1922, conditions of production and marketing both at home and abroad had changed. For example, in 1922 Europe was still in the process of recovery from the war, world conditions were in flux, and currencies were far from stabilized. Europe was now fully recovered, and the 1922 tariff no longer applied to current conditions. 90

Another issue that the House Ways and Means Committee wanted to discuss was whether to maintain the flexible tariff provisions of the 1922 tariff discussed early in this chapter. Some senators wanted the flexible provisions repealed. In 1928 Senators Joseph Robinson of Arkansas and Robert M. La Follette of Wisconsin signed a report calling for the repeal of the flexible provisions. 91

Agricultural rates would be the most important issue taken up by the House Ways and Means Committee. American farmers wanted protection under any new tariff. They suffered from the agricultural depression that had begun in 1920 and blamed everyone but themselves for their problems. The fact was that overproduction along with inelastic demand kept farm revenue low. However, the farmer saw how manufacturing benefitted from high tariffs by reducing competition. Farmers in the late 1920s wanted to eliminate many of the Danish dairy goods coming into the country that competed with their products. 92 Hoover, in his inaugural address, promised to raise tariffs to assist farmers struggling with failing prices. On March 7, 1929, shortly after his inauguration, Hoover called for a special session of Congress to meet on April 15 to make good on his promise to the farmers. When Congress met for its special session, it would pass the Hawley- Smoot Tariff Act, the most protective tariff in American history. 93


NOTES
1.
For a detailed account of the Fordney-McCumber Tariff see Edward S. Kaplan and Thomas W. Ryley, Prelude to Trade Wars: American Tariff Policy, 1890-1922 ( Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994), pp. 95-130.
2.
John D. Hicks, Republican Ascendancy, 1921-1933 ( New York: Harper and Row, 1960), pp. 18-19; Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Crisis of the Old Order, 1919-1933 ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1957), p. 105; Barry Eichengreen, "The Political Economy of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff," Research in Economic History 12 ( 1989): 6-8.
3.
Kaplan and Ryley, Prelude to Trade Wars, pp. 100-101, 112.
5.
Schlesinger, Crisis of the Old Order, pp. 105-106.
8.
New York Times, August 1, 1923, p. 1.
11.
Ibid.
13.
Ibid., January 11, 1924, p. 3; January 16, 1924, p. 2.

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Trade Policy: 1923-1995
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Background to the Hawley-Smoot Tariff 1
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - The Hawley-Smoot Tariff 38
  • 3 - The Building of a Liberal Trade Policy 43
  • Notes 60
  • 4 - The Trade Expansion Act and the Kennedy Round 65
  • Notes 86
  • 5 - The Trade Reform Act and the Tokyo Round 89
  • Notes 108
  • 6 - Fair Trade and the Uruguay Round 113
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - The North American Free Trade Agreement 137
  • Notes 156
  • 8 - A Return to Unilateralism 159
  • Notes 167
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.