Soviet Politics and the Ukraine, 1917-1957

By Robert S. Sullivant | Go to book overview

IV. CENTRALIZATION AND THE DEMAND FOR UNIFORMITY, 1927-1934

The Bolshevik successes in consolidating their position in the Soviet Union and overcoming opposition within the Party enabled them after 1927 to turn to new tasks--to the tasks of industrialization, collectivization, and national planning. Already some introductory steps had been taken: central planning agencies had been formed; socialist industries had been established on a modest scale. After 1927 these efforts were to be expanded and agriculture added to the list of institutions to be introduced to the Soviet pattern.

The consequences for the republics of the new socialist programs were considerable, not only because the programs were accompanied by a weakening of Russian enthusiasm for the policy of concessions to the border nationalities, but because the programs seemed to require an increase in central prerogatives and activity. As a result, the years after 1927 witnessed a steady accretion by the center of authority over the republics, particularly in economic fields, accompanied by a growing tendency among Russian leaders to view the national movements not as neutral forces to be drawn to the Bolshevik cause, but as centers of opposition to be reconstructed or suppressed.


CENTRALIZATION: ECONOMIC PLANNING AND DEVEL- OPMENT

The first of the new centralizing courses appeared in the field of agriculture--a field which before 1927 had been regulated chiefly by the republics. Although the 1924 constitution had authorized the Union to lay down general principles for the "development and use of land," it had also provided for local administration of agri-

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Soviet Politics and the Ukraine, 1917-1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • Preface V
  • Note on Transliteration VII
  • Contents IX
  • Introduction 1
  • I. the Bolshevik Approach to Nationalism and the Ukraine 7
  • Ii. Bolsheviks and the Revolution, 1917-1920 20
  • Iii. Federalism and Ukrainian Cultural Nationalism, 1921-1927 65
  • Iv. Centralization and the Demand for Uniformity, 1927-1934 149
  • V. the New Loyalty and National Rights, 1934-1944 209
  • Vi. the Culmination of National Restrictions, 1944-1953 243
  • Vii. the New Leadership, 1953-1957 280
  • Viii. Conclusion 314
  • Notes 327
  • Bibliography 397
  • Index 422
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