Soviet Politics and the Ukraine, 1917-1957

By Robert S. Sullivant | Go to book overview

VIII. CONCLUSION

In a general way the Ukraine has appeared in three characters to Soviet leaders, each character posing its own problems and prompting separate ideological and political programs. As a distinct ethnic region differing in language, traditions, and culture from central Russia, the Ukraine, with other minority areas, has forced the development of a nationality theory and significant modifications of political practices. As a distinct physical and political region, possessing a certain economic and territorial unity apart from its nationality character, the Ukraine has confronted Soviet leaders with a type of regional exclusiveness and ethnocentrism. And as a collection of districts in the Soviet Union, the Ukraine has most fondly been viewed by Russian officials as but one part of a single, uniform Russia with a system of politics integrated into the All-Russian system. Because the three characters have so differed from one another, it is not surprising that Soviet policies in the Ukraine have not always been consistent.

The most distinctive feature of the Ukraine has been its nationality character, and in the press and in official statements and studies the nationality question has been given much attention. But the most common theme of these discussions has been the relative unimportance of the nationality question and its subordination to the class question and the building of a Soviet state. Nationality questions are assumed to have no basic revolutionary importance and hence no permanent place in Bolshevik dogma. National feelings and hostilities result from economic rivalries and class pressures, existing only because they have been artificially stimulated by imperialist governments, anxious to win domestic support for imperialist ventures, or because they have developed among exploited peoples as a reaction to oppression. In neither

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Soviet Politics and the Ukraine, 1917-1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • Preface V
  • Note on Transliteration VII
  • Contents IX
  • Introduction 1
  • I. the Bolshevik Approach to Nationalism and the Ukraine 7
  • Ii. Bolsheviks and the Revolution, 1917-1920 20
  • Iii. Federalism and Ukrainian Cultural Nationalism, 1921-1927 65
  • Iv. Centralization and the Demand for Uniformity, 1927-1934 149
  • V. the New Loyalty and National Rights, 1934-1944 209
  • Vi. the Culmination of National Restrictions, 1944-1953 243
  • Vii. the New Leadership, 1953-1957 280
  • Viii. Conclusion 314
  • Notes 327
  • Bibliography 397
  • Index 422
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