Ratio of Children to Women, 1920: A Study in the Differential Rate of Natural Increase in the United States

By Warren S. Thompson | Go to book overview

VII
MISCELLANEA

Several interesting points that have come to light in the course of this study which do not seem to fit into any of the preceding chapters have been brought together under this heading.


RATIO OF CHILDREN TO WOMEN IN UTAH

The ratio of children to native white women in Utah is so anomalous in every respect that it deserves special mention. Salt Lake City ranks highest among the cities of over 100,000 in ratio of children to all native white women and fourth in ratio of children to native white married women. It ranks 38 and 40, respectively, in these marital groups for foreign-born white women. (See Tables 20 and 21, Chap. III.) Ogden, the only city in the State having 25,000 to 100,000 population, ranks 2 in ratio of children to all native white women and 8 in ratio of children to native white married women. (Table 28, Chap. IV.) In ratio of children to all foreign-born white married women it ranks 64.

There is nothing unexpected in these rankings for the foreign-born white women so we need not consider them further. Turning to the ratios of children to native white women among the smaller communities (cities of 10,000 to 25,000, of 2,500 to 10,000, and the rural districts) we find that Utah ranks first both for all women and for married women in all these communities. (Tables 34 and 37.) Furthermore, if our comparison is by States, Utah also ranks first in the two groups of larger cities. That it does not rank first when the States, as wholes, are under consideration is due to the fact that it has a considerably larger urban population than some of the Southern States which approximate it rather closely in their rural ratios.

The difference between the cities and the rural districts in Utah is practically the same as elsewhere. In the rural districts the native whites have a ratio slightly more than twice as great as Salt Lake City and over three-fourths greater than Ogden.1 Clearly, for all its conservative influence in Utah, religion can not stay the development of typically urban attitudes of mind in the modern city. Just as clearly, it does retard their spread. That Mormonism is the chief influence keeping the birth rate of Utah communities above that of the surrounding States can not be questioned. And Utah is the best example in the United States of a community in which religion does exercise a decided influence on the birth rate.

____________________
1
Calculated from data in Detailed Table I.

-135-

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