Civil Rights in the United States

By Alison Reppy | Go to book overview

Chapter VII
LABOR AND THE CONSTITUTION

THE New Deal came into power largely as a result of the votes of labor, and as a result labor was able to realize upon many of its objectives in the form of protective legislation. Indeed, the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt encouraged and even cultivated the growth of unionism on a scale never before witnessed in American history. Labor was not slow in seizing upon this opportunity and it soon developed weapons and practices for achieving objectives which had proven unattainable in the long and frustrating struggle of earlier years. This development was in a measure symbolized by the exceedingly liberal provisions of the Wagner Act. The spirit of change in the economic relationships of capital and labor which were introduced by the rapid and sweeping advances made by organized labor made necessary legal adjustments on a grand scale. It was inevitable that as the pendulum swung more and more in favor of labor that friction should arise. Legal controversies thus created found their way into the courts and presented a great variety of issues for judicial arbitrament. At the top of our judicial system stood the Supreme Court which sought to construe the new legislation in such a way as to satisfy labor and yet meet the demands of an industrial society. The courts sought to preserve the gains of labor while at the same time maintaining a balanced scale in the broad interest of social stability. This was substantially the situation when World War II broke out, and during this period of national peril, many thought that labor was guilty of grave excesses and many doubtful practices. These were resented by the men in arms as well as by some who remained at home. Hence, a demand sprang up for restrictive legislation, which took such forms as the legislation call-

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Civil Rights in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.