Women in Higher Education

By W. Todd Furniss; Patricia Albjerg Graham | Go to book overview

Foreword

The Council's Fifty-fifth Annual Meeting, for which the papers in this volume were prepared, was held in the same week that the Office of Contract Compliance published the first official guidelines on affirmative action. Within the next several months, congressional legislation extended to still other federal agencies authority for enforcement of nondiscrimination in colleges and universities. In the same period, reduced rates of growth in higher education and their effects on employment, retention, and salary policies, potentially disproportionate for women, became realities and began to be felt nationally.

It was the purpose of the meeting, as its co-directors point out in their preface to this volume, "to establish a solid ideological base line for future change in the practices of colleges and universities, and provide the rationale for some new practices now established or being tested in several kinds of institutions." The soundness of that aim has been justified by subsequent events: The considerations of equity made inescapably clear in this book--by reason and anecdote more than by emotion--must be translated into operational terms.

The academic community has not yet resolved all the issues raised in this book. A number of them are being dealt with in formal hearings and judicial proceedings now in progress. Nevertheless, the fundamental positions set forth and illustrated here are, for the most part, accepted as the starting point for resolving the remaining problems.

For the American Council on Education, the Fifty-fifth Annual Meeting and the publication of this book are only two elements in a larger program designed to help colleges and universities provide full equity for women students, faculty, and staff, and to assist the agencies charged with administering the laws of the land. Much of this effort is focused in the Council's Office of Women in Higher Education, its Equal Employment Opportunity Task Force, and its Office of Leadership Development in Higher Education, but it is also the continuing concern of the Council's Board of Directors and all its principal offices.

ROGER W. HEYNS, President

American Council on Education

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.