Women in Higher Education

By W. Todd Furniss; Patricia Albjerg Graham | Go to book overview

JUANITA M. KREPS


The Woman Professional in Higher Education

Academic women constitute a different population, statistically speaking, from academic men. In the world of academic women, career patterns develop along different lines. Women tend to serve in institutions which emphasize different functions, and they themselves are attracted to different kinds of functions. Further, they tend to be in areas which are not in strategic positions in the academic market place and which are not as productive as the areas that attract men. JESSIE BERNARD, Academic Women, 1964

SEX DIFFERENCES IN ACADEMIC CAREER PATTERNS, analyzed by Professor Bernard nearly a decade ago, have recently caught the attention of many scholars, whose subsequent work has provided new information on rank, tenure, and salary differential.1 In addition, study has focused attention on the extent to which the lower status of women is explained by discrimination,2 despite Executive orders

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1
See Alan E. Bayer and Helen S. Astin, "Sex Differences in Academic Rank and Salary among Science Doctorates in Teaching", Journal of Human Resources 3 ( 1968): 191-200; Jessie Bernard, Academic Women ( University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1964), and Careers of Ph.D.'s, Academic v. Nonacademic: Second Report on Follow-ups of Doctorate Cohorts, 1935-60 ( Washington: National Academy of Sciences, 1968); Helen S. Astin, The Woman Doctorate in America: Origins, Career, and Family ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1969); Ann S. Harris, "The Second Sex in Academe", AAUP Bulletin 56 ( 1970): 283-95; Patricia A. Graham, "Women in Academe", Science 169 ( 1970): 1284-90; Helen S. Astin and Alan E. Bayer, "Sex Discrimination in Academe", Educational Record 53 ( 1972): 101-18; Burton G. and Judith A. Malkiel, "Male- Female Differentials in Professional Employment", Working Paper No. 35 ( Princeton, N.J.: Industrial Relations Section, 1972); Michael A. LaSorte, "Sex Differences in Salary among Academic Sociology Teachers", American Sociologist, November 1972. See also Alice Rossi, ed., Academic Women on the Move ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation, forthcoming); the publications listed in Helen S. Astin, Nancy Suniewick, and Susan Dweck, Women: A Bibliography on Their Education and Careers ( Washington: Human Service Press, University Research Corporation, 1971); and John C. McKinney, "Women in the Academic Labor Force" ( Duke University) Graduate School Report 3 ( 1972).
2
See especially Astin and Bayer, "Sex Discrimination".

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