Women in Higher Education

By W. Todd Furniss; Patricia Albjerg Graham | Go to book overview

JACQUELYN A. MATTFELD


Many Are Called, But Few Are Chosen

In college and university organization, "the administration" denotes persons serving a broad spectrum of functions. Although the qualifications expected of administrators and the manner in which administrators are selected and advanced vary widely from one area of administration to another, among similar institutions the qualifications and manner of selection and advancement are strikingly similar.

Three general categories of administrators can be identified in the Ivy League schools and in most others. A first category includes persons who are employed to maintain and develop the physical plant and to manage the business operations, alumni and other public relations, and development. A second category is composed of those who work in admissions, financial aid, student affairs, the academic and personal counseling of students, placement, and the registrar's office. The final group comprises the academic leaders of the university--the president, chancellors, provosts, and the deans of faculties, of colleges, graduate and professional schools, and special programs. Almost everyone would, I hope, agree that the intelligence, abilities, and personal qualities that make for successful service in any of these areas of administration are to be found in women as well as in men. What, then, accounts for the persistent paucity of women in administration today? How and where can their numbers be increased?

The data I have collected on the administrators in the Ivy League universities and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology show that the categories delineated above derive not only from the types of jobs and the responsibilities entailed, but also from the qualifications traditionally set for admission to each of these categories. The data indicate that the problem of the paucity of women in the first two categories of administration is readily soluble if the habits of discrimination and chauvinism can be broken or weakened. Traditionally, the men hired for most of the openings in the first

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.