We Never Make Mistakes: Two Short Novels

By Alexander Solzhenitsyn; Paul W. Blackstock | Go to book overview

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE

The difficulties encountered in translating contemporary Russian are too well-known to require elaboration. They illustrate only too well the familiar Italian proverb, traduttore-traditore (the translator is a traitor). An attempt has been made to retain as much of the flavor of the original as possible in colloquial American English without sacrificing accuracy. Thus for those who may prefer to read the original without use of a dictionary the present translation is literal enough to serve as a useful guide. Unfamiliar abbreviations, such as NKPS ( People's Commissariat of Communication Routes) are explained as they occur in the text in brackets. Words which are left in the original Russian, such as izba (peasant hut or cottage), are handled in the same manner. Familiar abbreviations, such as NKVD (State Security, i.e. secret police) are left without explanation. A brief glossary of important and/or recurrent terms in the order of their occurrence is appended below.

I am indebted to Mrs. Dorothy Hanson, Professor of Russian at Columbia College, Columbia, South Carolina, for a first-draft literal translation of the Krechetovka Station story, and to Professor Samuel Pevsner of Washington, D. C., for invaluable assistance with unclean and difficult words in both stories. Like others who studied Russian under Prof. Pevsner while serving in the Pentagon, I am indebted to him for his patience, his stimulating teaching, and his encouragement to continue private study after leaving public service. Mrs. Elizabeth Legzdins of New York was helpful in trans-

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
We Never Make Mistakes: Two Short Novels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Translator's Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Glossary xix
  • An Incident At Krechetovka Station 1
  • Matryona's House 61
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 100

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.