Women in Higher Education

By W. Todd Furniss; Patricia Albjerg Graham | Go to book overview

Leo Kanowitz


Some Legal Aspects of Affirmative Action Programs

Some of the legal and constitutional issues that are raised by the concept of affirmative action programs are of especial interest to institutions of higher education. Stated briefly, these programs require employers subject to them to take positive steps to redress existing sex discrimination in their employment practices or to prevent such discrimination from occurring in the first place.

The circumstances under which a college or university can be required to formulate such an affirmative action program are varied. Recent impetus for their development has come, for example, from the requirements of Executive Order 11246, as amended by E.O. 11375, covering enterprises that contract with the federal government. Since few institutions of higher learning, whether private or public, do not hold substantial federal contracts supporting research or other activities, most have been subject to the affirmative action requirement of that Executive order, which prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sex, among other grounds.

Where complaints alleging sex discrimination have been brought under title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which administers that federal statute prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national origin, or sex, has often, in its conciliation efforts, accepted an employer's agreement to institute an affirmative action program as part of the settlement reached between the complaining party and the employer. Until recently, teachers were exempted from coverage under title VII--as were employees of state and local governments. Congressional repeal of those exemptions early in 1972 now permits affirmative action programs designed to redress a sex imbalance in the work force of higher education institutions to become a common feature of EEOC-supervised settle-

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.