The English Past: Evocations of Persons and Places

By A. L. Rowse | Go to book overview

DEAR DR. DENTON
AN ENGLISH GENTLEMAN OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

OF all the gallery of portraits with which the Verney Memoirs present us, there is none more appealing than that of Dr. William Denton. There is Sir Edmund Verney, the Standard-bearer, brave, impulsive to a fault, torn between conflicting claims of conscience and duty; or old Lady Denton, generous, dominating, indomitable, between whom and her son-in-law there was great mutual respect; or gossipy, chirpy Aunt Isham with her love of cards, her courage and resource; gallant young Mun Verney, among those put to the sword at Drogheda, or Jack Denton, killed on the bulwark at Abingdon; or the poor mad lady who brought the White House at Claydon into the family -- does she haunt it still, I wonder? Then there is Ralph Verney, sensitive and scrupulous, with his courtesy and consideration for others, a pillar of kindly strength to his family and all his friends. But his uncle, the Doctor -- dear Dr. Denton -- surpasses them all in the vivacity, the naturalness, -- so life-like and homely, like an old and cherished garment with its comfortable creases and folds -- with which his character comes across to us.

His letters are a complete revelation of the man he was, if they are not -- at least in the fragmentary way in which they necessarily appear in the Verney Memoirs -- of all his interests of mind. For, as we shall see, he was deeply interested in the public affairs of his time, and had contributions of his own to make to its political and religious thinking. These letters we owe to the abiding love there was between the Doctor and his nephew, that lasted unbroken all their lives: that friendship which makes the backbone to that vast, and otherwise rather disparate, family correspondence.

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The English Past: Evocations of Persons and Places
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • All Souls (1945) 1
  • Bisham and the Hobys 15
  • Hillesden in Buckinghamshire 46
  • Dear Dr. Denton - An English Gentleman of The Seventeenth Century 66
  • The Milton Country 85
  • Swift at Letcombe 113
  • Afternoon at Haworth Parsonage 143
  • Thomas Hardy and Max Gate 165
  • John Buchan at Elsfield 184
  • Nottingham: A Midlands Capital 196
  • D. H. Lawrence at Eastwood 217
  • Alun Lewis: A Foreword 238
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.