The Ghetto Game: Racial Conflicts in the City

By Dennis Clark | Go to book overview

3
Negroes Are . . .

EVEN IN THIS MODERN AGE of mobility and impersonality, the opinion of a man's neighbors is a powerful thing. It is in the face-to-face context of the residential neighborhood that men tend to reveal themselves as they are when a pressing issue arises. On such occasions the folk mind--if we can use such a term for the urbanite's complicated beliefs--speaks for itself. The slogans and formal pronouncements of the government, the university and the pulpit are set aside, and the mind of the people expresses itself. In a complex urban society, where stereotypes and contradictions abound, there is a restraint in the larger spheres of community expression--blocs of opinion must be balanced and embarrassment must be avoided. But in the local community the restraints are less formal, and with the advent of some threat or emergency, real or imagined, the ordinary reserve and caution break down, and the man himself speaks with the full conviction of his own personal views--right or wrong.

In a nation with a proud commitment to democratic ideals and a tradition of fervent public profession of these ideals, it is not extraordinary that attitudes conflicting with these formal ideals should be maintained in an unspoken fashion below the

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The Ghetto Game: Racial Conflicts in the City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Race and Our Cities 3
  • 2 - Segregation's Sequence 27
  • 3 - Negroes Are . . . 53
  • 4 - The Housing Industry-- Unfree Enterprise 83
  • 5 - Distant Neighbors 107
  • 6 - Streets of Danger 135
  • 7 - Renewal and Rights 159
  • 8 - The Order of Tolerance 181
  • 9 - The Determinants of Change 207
  • 10 - Formula for Urban Freedom 225
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