Iran

By Clifford R. Barnett; Wendell Blanchard et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
INDUSTRY

Fewer than 2 per cent of the people of Iran work at industrial occupations, and of these at least half are engaged in carpet making, handloom weaving, and other occupations that are mainly home crafts. Aside from petroleum, the country's chief raw material, there are few minerals produced, though there is thought to be a considerable wealth of mineral resources. There are potential sources of hydroelectric power, and much more use could be made of the oil supplied by Abadan as a source of energy for expanded Iranian industry.

The obstacles to industrial development in Iran are not confined, however, to the physical limitations of inadequate mineral supplies and insufficient power. The movement of semi-manufactured products or of manufactured goods to markets in Iran or to ports for export requires a more highly developed transportation network than now exists.

Transportation limitations are, in fact, a major hindrance to Iran's industrial development. The ruggedness of the country makes the construction of roads and railroads a major engineering problem. (See Chapter III, Geography and Population.) Paved roads are still few. Until the reign of Reza Shah the only railroad in Iran was a short branch running from the Russian border to Tabriz. In the 1930's a line was completed from the Persian Gulf to Teheran and the Caspian, and branches were sent east and west on the south side of the Elburz Mountains. The north-south roadbed was improved under the Persian Gulf Command during World War II.

Political instability and the need for more highly skilled labor are among other deterrents to industrial development. The problem of over staffing, faced by government administrators as well as by industrial management, also poses an efficiency problem for both existing and future industries. Iranians have given inadequate attention to proper repair and maintenance of equipment, and the building of reserves through proper

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Iran
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 366

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.