The Central Administration of the East India Company, 1773-1834

By B. B. Misra | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IN August, 1951, the governing body of my Siwan D.A.V. College, Patna University (now under Bihar University), was pleased to grant me leave of absence for a period of two years to undertake and complete this study in London. Mr. Baidyanath Prasad, an educationist, social reformer and secretary of the College, gave me his unstinted support. I owe him and the governing body much for the facilities ungrudgingly extended to me in the pursuit of my researches, including those for a degree of Doctor of Philosophy presented to the University of London in 1947.

I completed this work under the supervision of Professor C. H. Philips, now Director, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. I should like here to record my deep sense of obligation to him not only for the many valuable suggestions he offered in the course of his guidance, but also for the trouble he took to read the typescript and suggest improvements. He is, however, in no way responsible for any of the views expressed or conclusions reached.

I am also indebted to Mr. Philip Mason, late of the Indian Civil Service and now Director of Race Relations, Royal Institute of International Affairs, London. I gained considerably from his comments, proceeding as they did from his active historical investigation as well as from his practical experience of Indian administration. I am no less grateful to Dr. Kenneth Ballhatchet, a sound scholar and teacher of modern Indian history at the School of Oriental and African Studies, whom I often consulted and whose opinions I greatly valued.

I am much obliged to Mr. S. C. Sutton of the India Office Library and the members of his staff who allowed me full and free access to the Library and its archives. Their service and friendly co-operation were indeed remarkable. I must also thank the Indian Records Section of the Commonwealth Relations Office, the Keeper of the Records at the British Museum, and the Keeper of the Public Records Office, London, for their kind permission to use their archives.

I must express a final word of gratitude to. Mr. T. L. Jones, Secretary, Manchester University Press, for his guidance to facilitate publication, and to Mr. D. Matthews of the India Office Library who was pleased to assist me in reading the proofs.

The publication of the book was delayed on account of my being

-vii-

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The Central Administration of the East India Company, 1773-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I- The Supreme Government 17
  • Chapter II- The Central Secretariat 64
  • Chapter III- The Administration of Revenue 108
  • Chapter IV- The Settlement and Collection of Revenue 171
  • Chapter V- The Administration of Civil Justice 220
  • Chapter VI- The Administration of Criminal Justice and Police 298
  • Chapter VII- The Civil Service 378
  • Appendix Postal Communications 415
  • Bibliography 451
  • Index 460
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