Persuasion: How Opinions and Attitudes Are Changed

By Herbert I. Abelson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Since this book completely depends upon research conducted by social scientists and their students, my first obligation and gratitude is to the authors of the studies described here.

Claude Robinson of Opinion Research Corporation is the one person to whom I am most indebted. Dr. Robinson has for some time perceived the need for social scientists to interpret themselves to people trained in other fields. At his suggestion I prepared an earlier report which became the basis of this book.

The arrangement and content of the book reflect the suggestions and criticism of LeBaron R. Foster and W. Donald Rugg of Opinion Research Corporation, Thomas G. Andrews of the University of Maryland, and of my wife, Fay. Joseph C. Bevis and Hugh C. Hoffman of Opinion Research Corporation have been extremely helpful in a variety of ways.

I have had opportunity to draw on many sources, for which I am grateful, and the editors of the Harvard Business Review and the Public Opinion Quarterly have very kindly permitted three direct quotations of copyright material from their publications.

Lastly, my thanks to the board of directors of Opinion Research Corporation for their encouragement and financial assistance.

-vii-

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Persuasion: How Opinions and Attitudes Are Changed
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - How to Present the Issues 1
  • 2 - The Influence of Groups 19
  • 3 - The Persistence of Opinion Change 41
  • 4 - The Audience as Individuals 53
  • 5 - The Persuader 71
  • 6 - Broad Issues Related to the Study of Persuasion 87
  • 7 - Social Science Methods 93
  • 8 - A Few Definitions 101
  • References 105
  • Index 114
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