Diplomatic Relations between the United States and Brazil

By Lawrence F. Hill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
THE PARAGUAYAN WAR

DURING the latter half of Webb's mission at Rio de Janeiro Brazil was engaged in the Paraguayan War. Although allied with Argentina and the Colorado faction of Uruguay, Brazil was forced to carry a major part of the burden. More than once during the nearly five years of fighting she was on the verge of exhaustion. The American government became involved in this terrific conflict at several points.

At the outset it seems necessary to consider the causes of the war. In discussing causes, however, we shall not go further back than 1850 to pick up the threads. In that year, when Paraguay and Brazil were on most friendly terms, a treaty was entered into granting to Brazil transit by the Paraguay River to the imperial province of Matto Grosso. In the following year, however, while Brazil was at war with Dictator Rosas of the Argentine Confederation, the elder López, who was then president of Paraguay, seized the opportunity to occupy a strategic point on the Paraguay River which he had been wanting for some time and to which Paraguay had some claim. He also, after vainly urging the imperial government to recognize a certain boundary line in dispute between the two countries, imposed numerous vexatious restrictions upon Brazilian vessels destined for Matto Grosso. After the conclusion of the war with Rosas, Brazil protested in vain against the restrictive regulations on the use of the Paraguay. Finally, in 1856, the two governments concluded another treaty which restored to Brazil the right to navigate the Paraguay to Matto Grosso, though there was

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diplomatic Relations between the United States and Brazil
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.