Diplomatic Relations between the United States and Brazil

By Lawrence F. Hill | Go to book overview

INDEX
Aberdeen Act, 114
Acre question, discussion of, 285-291
Acto Addicional, 76
Adams, President John Quincy, negotiations in General Armstrong case, 13- 15; reproves Condy Raguet, 52 ff.
Adams, Robert, Jr., policy on recognition of Brazilian republic, 264 ff.
Agassiz, Louis F., visit to Brazil, 236- 238
Agnes, the, as a slaver, 124-126
Alabama, the, in Brazilian ports, 152-153
Alley Law, 169-170
Allied and Paraguayan forces compared, 183-184
Amazon Company of Navigation and Commerce, 232
American-Brazilian relations, change in character of, 259 ff.
American commerce, status of in Brazil, 266 ff.
"American" policy, attempts to secure, 91-92, 104 ff.
American press, position on recognition of Brazilian republic, 265
Araujo Lima, as Brazilian regent, 75
Argentine-Brazilian alliance against Paraguay, 182-183
Artigas, José, program in Banda Oriental, 16 ff., 33 ff.
Bahia, American connection with insurrection at, 79 ff.
Banda Oriental, Argentine-Brazilian rivalry concerning, 33 ff.
Baron de Itajubá, 260
Baron of Rio Branco, 283, 292-293
Barrios, Colonel, invades Matto Grasso, 180-181
Benham, Admiral, and Brazilian naval revolt, 278 ff.
Benham, Rev. J. B., on the slave trade 133
Blaine, James G., relation to First Pan- American Conference, 262; attitude toward recognition of Brazilian republic, 265-266; commercial policy of, 268 ff.; policy towards Deodora and Peixoto governments, 272 ff.
Bliss, Porter C., 199, 201, 204, 205
Blow, Henry T., policy as American minister, 259 ff.
Bocayuva, 242
Bolivian rivers, negotiations for opening, 225
Bolivian Syndicate, 285 ff.
Bowen, William, 251-252
Braz, President, and Brazilian-American relations, 302-303
Brazil, becomes independent, 26; recognized by the United States, 28-30; goes to war with Argentina, 35-36; complains of unneutral American course, 64 ff.; domestic problems, 74 ff.; attitude toward the slave trade, 112 ff.
Brazilian-American commercial relations since 1895, 293 ff.
Brazilian colonization agents in the United States, 242
Brazilian empire, causes for overthrow of, 263
Brazilian republic, establishment of, 263 ff.
Bright and Company, concessions in Brazil, 261
Buchanan, James, negotiates on Davis episode, 97 ff.
Buffalo Exposition, Brazil represented at, 292
Bureau of American Republics, 263
Buxton, T. F., author, 120-121
Cable concessions, 303-305
Canada, the, 207, 211, 212, 260
Caroline, the, 207, 208, 210, 211

-317-

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